Intelligence Brute: ACOG

Wildlife Crime

Illegal wildlife trade is a multi-billion-dollar industry that is decimating countless species around the globe, and that also extracts a heavy toll on the rangers, law enforcement officers, prosecutors, judges, and other dedicated conservationists putting their lives on the line to protect our world’s most imperiled species. The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to bring in up to $20 billion annually for international criminal networks and terrorist organizations, and the historically light sentences faced by poachers make wildlife trafficking a low risk-high reward crime for the perpetrators. This booming trade is devastating some of the world’s most beloved and iconic species, including Africa’s elephant and rhino species.

EIA has an extensive history of exposing illegal trade in endangered species products, including elephant ivory, rhino horn, tiger bone and skins, bear gall bladders, whale, dolphin and porpoise products, turtle shell, large scale trade in live caught wild birds and parrots, and destruction or degrading of their terrestrial or marine habitats. Our strategies rely on detailed investigations to document illegal trade in products of such threatened species, and we use that evidence to gain international and domestic precautionary policies and solutions to increase protections for threatened species.

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EIA Comments on NOAA Draft Climate Science Regional Action Plan

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Japan Targeted by Zimbabwe as Future Ivory Buyer

In a jarring photo worth a thousand words, Japan’s Ambassador to Zimbabwe, Satoshi Tanaka, holds a large elephant tusk from Zimbabwe’s stockpile, which he toured last week. The image crystallizes EIA’s concern that Japan continues to be perceived as a potential buyer for any wishful future international sales of ivory. Before Zimbabwe’s African Elephant Summit in Hwange […]

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Poached Timber

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Letters

Letter: NGOs Urge Tokyo to Implement Advisory Council’s Recommendations on Ivory Trade

EIA and 26 international non-government environmental and conservation organizations sent a letter May 10, 2022, following up on previous letters and appeals to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government (TMG), to urge TMG to follow through on its commitment and take action to address concerns about Tokyo’s ivory trade by implementing the recommendations of the Advisory Council. The […]

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Press Release

Tokyo Ivory Assessment Process Closes, Includes Consideration of Legal Measures to Address Ivory Trade

Environmentalists welcomed the recommendations from the designated panel of experts to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government (TMG) on steps to take to address its ivory trade problem. After international concerns were raised about Tokyo’s ivory trade and illegal exports, in January 2020 Tokyo’s Governor Koike expressed a commitment to taking meaningful action in Tokyo, as leading international city, […]

Blog

The good, the bad and the ugly

EIA campaigners present their detailed analysis on the decisions made at the recent CITES Standing Committee gathering in Lyon, France. EIA’s UK and US Wildlife Teams were at the 74th Meeting of the Standing Committee (SC74) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), in Lyon, 7-11 March 2022. The meeting was held […]